induction cookware Resources Blog

induction hobs induction cookware Resources Blog

Finding specific information about induction cookware might not be easy but we have gathered very relevant information about the general subject matter, with the ultimate aim of helping you out. Even if you are searching for other information somehow related to induction cookware, this article should help a great deal.

Induction cookware is the cookware of the future. These pots and pans are reactive to magnetic fields so that they will heat up from the electro magnetic field that is generated by the induction cooktop. This type of cooktop has been used in Europe for quite some time and is becoming very popular now in the US.

Many restaurants and home kitchens are turning toward this type of cooking technology because it is a more efficient form of cooking and can be extremely safe and can cost significantly less than the traditional electric or gas stoves or ovens. Also these cooking surfaces do not have heating elements to get burned on and they are easier to clean.

These kinds of cooking vessels need to be magnetic and have an absolutely flat bottom. Cookware for induction ranges are made from magnetic materials,iron being one of them to generate heat magnetically which transfers to the food. Some of your conventional pots and pans that you have right now might be able to be used on a induction cooktop.

If you have any cast iron cookware well your good to go. However you may have other cookware that can be used for this type of cooking and you can find out by just using a simple magnet.

Just take a magnet and place on the bottom of the pot or pan and if it sticks to the bottom then it will work with an induction cooktop. If the magnet sticks to the pan without assistance, then the cookware simply is not suitable for induction cooking.

Non-induction cookware simply will not work on an induction stove or oven. Some of these cooking vessels would be made from aluminum, copper and glass just to name a few.

There are a number of manufacturers today offering what is called induction ready or induction compatible cookware. This cookware typically can be used on convention cooktops as well as induction type cooktops. Remember if your not sure if a piece of cookware is induction ready just perform the simple magnet test.

Cuisinart MCP-12 MultiClad Pro Stainless Steel 12-Piece Cookware Set
Emerilware Pro Clad Stainless Steel Tri-Ply 12-Piece Cookware Set
Cuisinart 77-10 Chef's Classic Stainless-Steel 10-Piece Cookware Set
Berndes Coquere 16 Piece Induction Cookware Set
Regal Ware 3-Piece Induction Cooktop/Cookware Set
Circulon Infinite Hard Anodized Nonstick 10-Piece Cookware Set
Berndes Coquere Aluminum Induction 10-Piece Cookware Set
KitchenAid Gourmet Distinctions Stainless Steel 10-Piece Cookware Set
Berndes Cucinare Stainless Induction 10-Piece Cookware Set
Berndes Cucinare 16 Piece Induction Cookware Set
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Google Videos - induction cookware
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induction hobs induction cookware Resources Blog

15 Responses to “induction cookware Resources Blog”

  • Mike Ezra:

    no, but you can poop on a midget.

  • Biofreak:

    Wow, this took me awhile to figure out, since so many websites give incorrect information on this topic. But I think I got it.Eddy currents have nothing whatsoever to do with ferrous materials. Eddy currents are a feature of conductors in general. So any object that can conduct electricity can have eddy currents (and will) when subjected to changing magnetic or electric fields. That means that any metal should work in an induction oven.Now the issue I had was trying to figure out why the wiki article claims only ferrous materials will work for your pots. Here’s what I came up with:Eddy currents are not the primary cause of heating in an induction cooker. Though eddy currents will cause heat, they only partially counter the change in magnetic field, which means most of that potential energy does not get absorbed by the pot.If, however, you use a magnetic pot (iron), then not only do you get an eddy current effect, but you also get an effect from the magnetic boundaries in the pot aligning with the external changing magnetic field. In fact, in a real-world induction cooker, this is the dominant heating mechanism. So if you use a magnetic pot, your pot will heat much faster and cook better than if it were simply a conductor.Now, I also want to bring to your attention that ‘ferrous’ is not the right term. What you want is a magnetic pot. Ferrous means iron containing. Now iron happens to be magnetic and is the most common magnetic pot, but nickel would also work because it is magnetic and not ferrous. Furthermore, stainless steal is a very common pot material, and includes a lot of iron, so is ferrous; but most stainless steal is not strongly magnetic, so it may not be a good pot for induction cooking.Looking over that wiki article, I think this is an excellent example of why wikipedia pages should not be used as a source… they are often wrong.

  • West:

    I haven’t had any experience with this but did some searching. The mat is recommended on quite a few sites. You can buy silpats from most kitchen stores or Amazon. http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?order_num=-1&SKU=11556167http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=silpat&x=0&y=0Here is another product:http://cookshoppl.cart.net.au/details/595219.htmlFound this from another site but many others had about the same thing.”I have a mixture of cast iron and All Clad that I use on it and I always put a Silpat mat under the pot I am using to prevent scratches but more importantly, to stop the cookware from sliding on the cooktop especially when stirring with one hand :) “http://www.americastestkitchen.com/ibb/posts.aspx?postID=217970Hope that helps. =)

  • Nurse Diesel:

    Magnetic and flat – they pretty much have to be stainless steel. Both copper and aluminum are non-magnetic. Cast iron works, but apparently it’s not flat enough. You’ll have to spend a bit of cash – apparently the theory being that if you can afford the stove, you can afford the pots, but this is a good time of year to buy that stuff, as it’s on sale right now. Just bring a magnet with you when you shop.

  • fooles.troupe:

    If web searches have failed to locate them, you are probably out of luck. The company should have a web address, you could contact them.

  • Cookware B:

    Induction cookware is ferrous which means it supports a magnetic field. Basically it is made of iron or some other metal that supports a magnetic field. This being the case some cookware that you would use on an induction stove is fine to use on a gas stove. However, some have a special coating that could be damaged if used on a gas stove for an extended period of time. If possible the best way to be sure is to consult your owners manual.

  • billrussell42:

    i just want to know is current flowing thru us when we touch the ends of a 1.5v batteryyesi know our resistance is high, but if i am not wrong, there is still a small harmless current flowing thru us, and thus the battery will weaken over time, is this true? yessecond question is on induction cooking, we all know it causes eddy current to flow in the cookware, now… wun that be dangerous to us handling the cookware, as we risk getting electric shock.no, only danger is from touching something that is hot.

  • Elizabeth:

    Make sure that you have decent wattage i would say at least 3000 or you are going to end up with the draw backs of induction with out the benefit. If you’ve never used an induction cooktop before they take a little getting used to, you’ll find that you have a tendency to burn things in the beginning.

  • Trent:

    Try to find somebody who sells magic chef cookware. They sell it kind of like mary kay. They have excellent products but can be a bit pricey. But it’s worth the investment.

  • inabinet:

    The pots n pans aren’t magnetic, but must respond to magnetism. A dimple or divot in a smooth, flat pan to which a magnet will attach should be fine.Most people that have induction cooktops love them. They are safe, clean and easy to use and maintain. One caveat as a technician/troubleshooter who has dealt with these units- buy quality with an extended warrantee if available AND have them professionally installed by someone qualified AND experienced to specifically work with this product. Make them give you an installation warrantee in writing, that they are experienced & have followed all Manufacturer and Electrical supply guidelines.Most problems I dealt with were either installation AND power supply or user inexperience. Local sales and service initially are important. NOT a DIY project!!!!!Enjoy _saPs: about “singing pans” usually the pan surface or coil mounting- not typical or common problem. _s

  • Dave C:

    Induction is a type of cooktop that works on electro-magnetics. As a result you need a steel/magnetic pan.Are these suitable for the oven?Depends upon how hot the (silicone) handles can go and how hot you want to turn on the oven. The website does not mention a temperature limit on the handles so you’ll have to look at your paperwork for the pans.

  • BustedFlush:

    Wow, that’s a good question. I personally have never used an induction cooktop, but I hear they are the bee’s knees and I’d love to have one. They get really hot, really fast. Great for wok cooking. Amazon says they run from about $130 to $170, so with the extra pieces in the 10pc set, it isn’t a bad deal. You could always eBay the cooktop. In new condition it would probably sell for between $90-100, but there’s time/hassle/shipping to figure in there.Hmmm. If it were me; even as much as I’d love to have an induction cooktop, I couldn’t justify it. Like you say, it would take up counter space, and I’d only use it now and then.

  • Chef Anne:

    Yes, AMC cookware can be used in an induction cooker. Here’s what the AMC website says:”AMC cookware is suitable for all heat sources, including induction.”Happy cooking! :)

  • chefcherie:

    The brands I know offhand that work for induction stoves are AllClad, Circulon(for nonstick) and Henckels. Also all cast iron, enamel coated or raw, works on induction. There are other brands that will work. The trick is to take a fridge magnet with you to the store and hold it to the bottom of a pan. If it sticks, it will work on your stove. If you have a Bed Bath & Beyond near you, find a coupon and go shop. It’s the cheapest way I have found to buy those brands.And congratulations on getting an induction cooktop! I am insanely jealous. They are literally the best cooktop available. Energy efficient and they cook faster than gas.

  • Fido Steik:

    The pots n pans aren’t magnetic, but must respond to magnetism. A dimple or divot in a smooth, flat pan to which a magnet will attach should be fine.Most people that have induction cooktops love them. They are safe, clean and easy to use and maintain. One caveat as a technician/troubleshooter who has dealt with these units- buy quality with an extended warrantee if available AND have them professionally installed by someone qualified AND experienced to specifically work with this product. Make them give you an installation warrantee in writing, that they are experienced & have followed all Manufacturer and Electrical supply guidelines.Most problems I dealt with were either installation AND power supply or user inexperience. Local sales and service initially are important. NOT a DIY project!!!!!Enjoy _saPs: about “singing pans” usually the pan surface or coil mounting- not typical or common problem. _s

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